Many, Much, Few & Little

Tag:
Many/Much
Many is used with a noun that names things that we can count.
 
Much is used to describe things that we do not count.
 
Many (count/plural)   
Many manuscripts are
Many vehicles are
Many authors are
 
Much (noncount/singular)     
Much talk is
Much controversy is
Much criticism is
 
Some nouns can be either count or noncount, depending on their use:
 
Many of the troubles disappeared when he outlined his points.
Much of the trouble with his proposal was the lack of focus and of logical development of points.
 
Few/Little
Little is used with uncountable and few is used with countable nouns. When we use few and little without the indefinite article, they usually have a negative meaning, but when we use them with the indefinite article, a little or a few, they have a more positive meaning. Compare the following:
 
I have few friends in England and I feel quite lonely.
 
I have a few friends in England, so I don't miss home so much.
 
I have little interest in classical music. I much prefer pop.
 
I have a little wine in the cellar. Would you like some?
 
Rather than little or few, we sometimes prefer to use a negative construction with much or many in conversational English, as it sounds slightly less formal:
 
He has little money. > He doesn't have very much money.
 
She had few friends. > She didn't have many friends.
 
Fewer / Less
Fewer and less are the comparative forms of few and little and are used with countable and uncountable nouns, respectively. Compare the following:
 
I've got a little (bit of) money in the bank. Not very much. Less than I had last year.
 
The weather was awful and fewer children took part in the procession this year.

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