Fill in the Blanks: FB 012

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Fill in all the gaps with the best alternative among the given four options. After filling up all the gaps press on "Check" to check your answers.

The options are :
Q1. a. endemic   b.contagious   c. limited   d. epidemic

Q2. a. unrepentant   b. remorseful   c. contrite   d. stubborn

Q3. a. cassock   b. pastor   c. layperson   d. layman

Q4. a. bitterly   b. acrimoniously   c. honeyed   d. mildly

Q5. a. accusation   b. indictment   c. vindication   d. exoneration

Q6. a. chewed   b. crumbed   c. jotted   d. mited

Q7. a. bourgeois   b. unabashed   c. haughty   d. aloof

Q8. a. abstinence   b chastity   c. revelry   d. carousal

Q9. a. debacle   b. flop   c. deed   d. revolution

Q10. a. bout   b. convulsion   c. dysfunction   d. ailment


Guess the writer: "Liberals blaming me for corruption in Washington is like the KKK blaming Martin Luther King, Jr. for an Q1. of burning crosses." It's Tom DeLay – Q2. , but hoping to give history a hand by telling his side of one of the most astonishing rise-and-fall stories in American politics.
His book, out Monday, is called "No Retreat, No Surrender: One American's Fight." He wrote it with Stephen Mansfield, a former Texas Q3. whose works include the New York Times bestseller "The Faith of George W. Bush."
DeLay, who Q4. resigned from Congress last year in the wake of an criminal Q5. on campaign finance charges and has made little secret he has scores to settle, claims that former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, now a potential presidential candidate, initially "Q6. me out" for even considering calling for former President Bill Clinton to resign, but later "saw the wisdom of our plan and got onboard." Other eye-opening passages in the book, which can be polished off in a couple of hours and was obtained by Politico:
DeLay, who became a born-again Christian as a result of participating in congressional Bible study sessions, is Q7. in talking about the sins of his past. He says that early in his congressional career, he "was living the life of a selfish jerk" and routinely knocked down a dozen martinis during an evening of Q8. . "There were still women in my life, and this was despite the fact that (his wife) Christine was the love of my life and I had a sweet daughter needing her father at home," he says. He writes that when he accepted Christ as his savior, "I repented of my ways with women, and have never gone back to that empty way of life."
"Newt is an amazingly gifted man. He is intelligent, articulate, informed, and passionate to a fault. He was a wonderful field general who loved to fight and knew how to rally troops to battle. I still believe he was the right man for the job of creating a Republican Q9. , and that the nation owes him a debt of gratitude. It is equally true, though, that he was an ineffective speaker of the House. He knew nothing about running meetings and nothing about driving an agenda. … Newt wanted to turn the ship of state on a dime. Nearly every other day he had a new agenda, a new direction he wanted us to take. It was impossible to follow him, and this was largely because he was beset with the classic academic's Q10. : He thought the ideas alone were enough, that thinking made it so." dysfunction me out" for even considering calling for former President Bill Clinton to resign, but later "saw the wisdom of our plan and got onboard." Other eye-opening passages in the book, which can be polished off in a couple of hours and was obtained by Politico.